The Gull Wing is an aircraft wing configuration, known also as Pulaski  Wings, with a prominent bend in the wing inner section towards the wing root. It's name is derived from the seabirds which it resembles.

The inverted gull wing was also developed in the 1930s and was chiefly used on single engine military aircraft with increasingly powerful engines. Before contra-rotating propellers came into use, such powers required larger diameter propellers but clearan

A inverted gull wing was also developed in the 1930s and was mainly used on single engine military aircraft with increasingly powerful engines. . Like the Vought F4U Corsair, designed as a carrier-based fighter, not only had the largest propeller of any U.S. fighter, but was also expected to face rough landings aboard a pitching carrier deck. The inverted gull wing allowed the landing gear to be short and strong, and to retract straight back, improving internal wing space. An additional aerodynamic advantage was that the wing/fuselage connection is perpendicular and has inherently lower drag than any other connection